LIVING ON A DOLLAR A DAY BY RENEE C. BYER



  • WIZNU Studios (map)
  • 724 South Spring Street #703
  • Los Angeles, CA, 90014
  • United States

LIVING ON A DOLLAR A DAY: THE LIVES AND FACES OF THE WORLD’S POOR BY RENÉE C. BYER

Opening April 14, 2016, An Official Exhibition of Month of Photography Los Angeles, Living on a Dollar A Day: The Lives and Faces of the World’s Poor, features compelling photographs by Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, Renée C. Byer, who traveled to ten countries on four continents to illuminate the human faces of poverty.

Drawn from Byer’s internationally acclaimed book, Living on a Dollar a Day is a preview for a larger show that inspires viewers to put an end to extreme poverty through compassion, education and social action. These powerful images and stories help us understand the harsh conditions endured by people living on the brink of survival, and then learn how we can change those circumstances. The book won First Place Documentary Book from the International Photography Awards in 2014. Byer narrates a documentary about the project that will be released in 2016.

Renée C. Byer is an award-winning American documentary photojournalist best known for her in-depth work focusing on the disadvantaged and those who otherwise would not be heard. Her ability to produce photographs with profound emotional resonance and sensitivity earned her the Pulitzer Prize for feature photography in 2007 and dozens of national and international honors, including the World Understanding Award from Pictures of the Year International, and Pulitzer Finalist in 2013. Her photographs have appeared in publications and exhibitions around the world, notably at Visa Pour L’Image Festival of the Photograph 2014, in Perpignan, France.

Known for her ability to translate stark statistics into images that connect us to our humanity, Byer has deepened our understanding of the leading issues of our time—environmental degradation, climate change, extreme poverty, genetically modified food, healthcare, women at war, domestic violence, and the drought and economic crisis in California.
On view through April 17th, 2016. 

Child Herder in Bolivia © Renée C. Byer Following the death of his father, Alvaro Kalancha Quispe, 9, helps his family survive by herding. He opens the gate to the stone pen that holds the family's alpacas and llamas each morning so they can graze throughout the hillsides during the day. He then heads off to school, but must roundup the animals in the evening, in the Akamani mountain range of Bolivia in an area called Caluyo, about an hour from the city of Qutapampa. In this area of Bolivia’s highlands, residents live approximately 13,000 feet above sea level, in homes without insulation, electricity or beds. Their water comes from streams that run off the snow-covered mountains.

Child Herder in Bolivia © Renée C. Byer
Following the death of his father, Alvaro Kalancha Quispe, 9, helps his family survive by herding. He opens the gate to the stone pen that holds the family's alpacas and llamas each morning so they can graze throughout the hillsides during the day. He then heads off to school, but must roundup the animals in the evening, in the Akamani mountain range of Bolivia in an area called Caluyo, about an hour from the city of Qutapampa. In this area of Bolivia’s highlands, residents live approximately 13,000 feet above sea level, in homes without insulation, electricity or beds. Their water comes from streams that run off the snow-covered mountains.

Working to Survive © Renée C. Byer In an e-waste dump that kills nearly everything that it touches in Ghana, West Africa, Fati, 8, works with other children searching through hazardous waste in hopes of finding whatever she can to exchange for pennies in order to survive. While balancing a bucket on her head with the little metal she has found, tears stream down her face as the result of the pain that comes with the malaria she contracted some years ago. This is work she must do to survive.

Working to Survive © Renée C. Byer
In an e-waste dump that kills nearly everything that it touches in Ghana, West Africa, Fati, 8, works with other children searching through hazardous waste in hopes of finding whatever she can to exchange for pennies in order to survive. While balancing a bucket on her head with the little metal she has found, tears stream down her face as the result of the pain that comes with the malaria she contracted some years ago. This is work she must do to survive.